Hi everyone - I've enjoyed reading your comments at the end of my biography and look forward to getting more comments and queries.

- especially some based on my first article (about identifying tasks).

Albert - you asked five useful questions and I'll start with your last two:

4. What are the best ways to evaluate the tasks given in the class?

5. Should the tasks be evaluated by teachers or learners?

Everything you do in the classroom should be evaluated - not just tasks. And both by teachers and learners.

In fact you as a teacher are probably evaluating all the time (and so are learners...) You can tell - often by the way learners are sitting - whether they are engaged or bored or worried or having fun... And when you walk out of a class you are often thinking about how the lesson went - 'That felt like a good lesson'... or reflecting on what you might change the next time....

But it is a good idea to sometimes make the process of evaluation a little more formal and to ask learners what they thought of a particular activity - you get great insights from learners'comments and suggestions. You can do this directly after the task or first thing next lesson, when they have had time to reflect and digest...

So here are some ideas on how to involve learners in evaluation:

- give individual learners slips of paper or post-it notes and ask each person to write 2 things they liked and one thing they didn't like much about the task or activity (in L1 if they are beginners) No need for them to put their names - it is best if its anonymous. Collect them in and read them after class and analyse the data... Take especial note of what is said by more than one or two learners.

- ask learners to do this in twos, then fours, then agree on and give in their final comments. (this makes a good task!)

- or you can write a frame for them to fill in:

What I liked about the task was ....

Next time, can't we.... / I would prefer to ....

I'd like to do more ... / less ...

Other comments...

 

A further answer to Question 4 can be found at the start of my first article - apply that list of questions.

For example - question 1 is about learner engagement...

If you see that all learners are engaged and are busy doing the task using mainly English and meaning what they say - then it's a good task. If they finish in one minute, using minimal language - then less good. And you will need to think about adding a stage to get them all talking more...

If they achieve the outcome and feel reasonably successful (questions 3 and 4) - then that too is positive.

If they realise how this activity prepares them for a real life situation - again positive.

 

I hope this is helpful - please post other ways you have got your learners' feedback on tasks!

Jane

 

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