End of the Year Activities

The end of the academic year in Siberia can be quite exotic. While there are still huge piles of snow scattered around in May, including those up-to-the-first-floor-windows sagging mounds, the temperatures may reach +30C. Every short break between lessons, hordes of over-excited screaming children rush outside dressed in their T-shirts, shorts and sneakers (trainers) to jump gleefully on that soft “last” snow, at times going all the way down and being rescued by their classmates.

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Assessment old and new

Assessment and grading are traditional indispensable staples of teaching and learning; it encompasses any subject and all the aspects of our work. Ideally it is supposed to show a student’s progress and our own ability to teach. In a simplified way, it goes like this: we “give” a topic, students do exercises and homework, regurgitate all the new knowledge in the classroom with various success. They get daily marks for every exercise fulfilled which produces an overall impression about the new material for us and for them.

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Using digital tools to help promote learning outside the classroom.

We are waiting for our flight at the airport. My husband talks quietly to his colleagues discussing a scientific project while I check in with our children, then click on various favorite links like The Free Dictionary, Teaching English and a few others. All around us people of all ages and nationalities are engaged in similar activities, talking, listening, writing, using their smartphones, iPads and other devices. The number of languages spoken is very impressive.

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Observing Others and Being Observed

When I first started teaching EL at the university, I visited several lessons conducted by my own former school teacher. Here are a few new insights which I learned as an observer.

• How to parcel out various topics; how much or how little we may fit into 45 minutes; how to stop myself from sharing ALL my own knowledge of a current theme at once so as not to overload my students. I appreciated how much she knew, and how effortlessly she doled out information so as to involve her class in the process but not overwhelm them.

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Learning Strategies

My long experience with ELT at all levels and ages has led me to the following simple conclusions; One, to quote Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626), is this: “Knowledge is power”. Two, we cannot change human nature.

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Festivals of Other Countries in an EL Lesson

Traditionally, the introduction into the world of other cultures happens at an EL lesson close to Christmas. The first mystery our students face is this: why is Christmas celebrated on December 25 in many European countries while in the Russian Orthodox Church it falls on January 7? I remember trying to understand the whole idea of different calendar systems that our EL teacher explained to us in second grade. In middle and high school today we can suggest that our students research the subject online and make their own short reports in the classroom.

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Reflection as Part of a Teacher’s Life

When new acquaintances ask me about my profession, I often jokingly reply that I am a professional chatterbox. Indeed, after a quarter century of teaching I can deliver a ninety minute lecture on various topics even in my sleep so to speak. And naturally I have a stock of stories to fill in any lull in a conversation if needed. To wit, most of our work is indeed talking, but not all of it.

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Writing as an Integral Part of a Lesson.

Writing is greeted enthusiastically by younger pupils because for them it is a new challenge. They revel in their ability to construct a whole sentence from the recently learned words, and proudly present their efforts to the class and to the teacher. In primary school three sentences are already a story or an essay. “The soldier walks to the palace. He wants food, drink and the princess. Three magic dogs help him”. Recognize “The Tinderbox”, a fairy tale by the Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen, originally published on May 8, 1835, under the title “Fyrtoiet”?

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Differentiated Teaching and Learning

Posted by NinaMK

As a student at Moscow University, I was part of an experiment conducted by the head of the English Department. After our first semester and examination session, she insisted that those who got straight A’s should be enlisted into the same academic group. Nobody asked our opinion. Thus when we returned from our winter break we learned that we were now members of an elite group of eight students.

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