Storytelling: Carnival crime

This lesson plan gives learners the opportunity to participate in the storytelling process.

Author
Fiona Lawtie, Teacher, Freelance materials writer

The plan is suitable for primary learners at A1 and above and is based on a story about a diamond theft at the Rio Carnival in Brazil. 

Introduction

Stories are a highly adaptable teaching tool and can be used in a variety of ways to teach a range of skills. This lesson focuses on extended listening skills and getting learners to actively participate in the storytelling process, allowing them to use their prediction skills in a creative and fun way. There are also some follow-up activities that develop speaking skills and different areas of language in the story.

Topic

Carnival in Brazil

Level

CEFR level A1+

Time

45+ minutes

Aims

  • To develop extended listening and prediction skills using a short story
  • To give learners the opportunity to participate in the storytelling process

  • To develop speaking skills

  • To reinforce the use of the past simple tense

Materials 

  • worksheet (one per learner)
  • script and cards (one set for the teacher)
  • story text (one per pair of learners, optional)
  • world map and/or pictures of Brazil and the Rio Carnival (optional)
Downloads
Lesson plan295.82 KB
Worksheet366.42 KB
Story text180.72 KB
Language Level

Comments

Submitted by Gulshan Huseynli on Thu, 05/26/2011 - 17:27

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My students liked it a lot. They especially were enthusiastic watching carnival photos In Brazi that were projected on the wall. This story was interesting for them. They liked to predict the story answering my questions. The photos of the story on the wall was fun. It was fun that one of the students began to predict the story beforehand  but it was love story. Story card ordering activity was very facinating for them. Thank you very much for this lesson plan.

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