Luke Meddings explores ways to build memorable lessons and lesson sequences using non-‘teaching’ stimulus that is readily available to teachers and learners in the UK and elsewhere. September 2012, London.

The idea of found objects derives from taking things designed for another purpose and turning them into art: Picasso’s bull’s head made from bicycle parts is a famous example. The principle for teaching is the same: find something interesting and use it as stimulus for a lesson. 

Although it is possible to generate interaction merely by displaying a ‘found object’, we also need to develop lesson frameworks and teaching strategies which help us to shape this into a learning experience. 

In this workshop Luke Meddings explores ways to build memorable lessons and lesson sequences using non-‘teaching’ stimulus that is readily available to teachers and learners in the UK and elsewhere. As we do this, we'll look at some key questions, including:

  • Is there a difference between 'stimulus' and 'materials' in the classroom?
  • How much structure should we provide - and how do we find a balance between direction and support?  
  • What are the pros and cons of verbal and non-verbal stimulus?
  • How can learners be encouraged to source their own objects?
  • How can found objects be used to inspire project work?

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