A beginner's guide to mobile learning in ELT

In this practical seminar Amy Lightfoot explores the current opportunities for learning English using mobile phones both in and out of the classroom. May 2012, London.

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In this practical seminar Amy Lightfoot explores the current opportunities for learning English using mobile phones both in and out of the classroom. She debates the pros and cons of this medium and looks at a variety of content that is currently available. She shares her experiences of creating some of this content, and discusses the early outcomes of these projects. Amy also considers the educational implications of widespread mobile phone availability, particularly in developing countries.

Amy Lightfoot is a freelance ELT materials writer, teacher and teacher trainer, based in the UK. Her regular clients include the British Council and the BBC. She has recently been involved in several large-scale multi-platform materials writing projects, including writing content for mobile learning.

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Comments

Submitted by Kristy Oki on Tue, 09/06/2016 - 06:42

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I accept the beginners guide to mobile learners in ELT.

Submitted by Jason Jixun M… on Fri, 02/17/2017 - 00:57

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Currently, Smart mobile phone's digital functions - such as sound-recording, video-recording, peers-sharing communities, presentations-giving, homework-delivering, APPs for special subjects are still main supplements for classroom-based traditional courses, especially in developing countries.

Submitted by iamgreensauce on Fri, 09/01/2017 - 04:54

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Mobile tech has helps it very simple to browse for information through the site.

Submitted by TeacherMrGinHK on Thu, 03/22/2018 - 03:12

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It is definitely something that should be considered; however, as clearly stated in this webinar the drawbacks are numerous and potentially very dangerous. I think using this type of technology in the classroom would need to be limited to adults that are well known to the teacher. Younger learners would need a lot more guidance and limitations set on their device. Therefore, I think use of tablets would prove a greater benefit. I think something overlooked (or i missed it) is the screen size of mobile devices and having broken screens! This would definitely limit a lot of the applications available to the device.

Hello Kaif

If you are studying English, you might want to look at LearnEnglish website for English language learners:

https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/

Here you will find lots of activities to help you with your English - we hope you find it useful.

Best wishes,

Cath

TE Team

Submitted by Ikli Elbachir on Sun, 03/01/2020 - 11:53

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I think that using mobile learning should be dealt with carefully taking into consideration the cognitive and sociocognitive characteristics of learners constrained by specific pedagogical rationale because this use can hinder the process of learning if not studied and prepared in a careful and comprehensive way

Submitted by Sk.Ismail on Tue, 03/24/2020 - 05:53

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Yes, its correct. Learning through mobile is only informative but not cognitive. Thought generation is basic for language acquisition. Artificial intelligence canfufill choice of thoughts but not generated thoughts

Submitted by Oupajohn on Sat, 05/02/2020 - 10:29

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Could have been a good seminar but the sound was frequently too soft, Amy spoke too fast for non-English listeners. I was hoping to find more information on how to handle feedback (how to get it, how to answer queries) in a multi-student class.

Being in mid-70's myself, I am frequently still baffled with how to use technology effectively. Maybe that's my problem!

Hi Oupajohn

Thanks for the feedback and sorry that you had problems hearing the audio on the webinar.

There are lots of resources about giving feedback to students on the site - you can do a search using the search button on the homepage - here's a couple of examples - one on feedback generally:

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/feedback-why-we-need-think-carefully-about-process

And another that focuses specifically on digital tools for feedback:

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/blogs/amin-neghavati/digital-tools-giving-feedback

Hopefully you will find these and our other resources helpful.

Best wishes,

Cath

TE Team

Submitted by Mandoumbé on Sat, 05/01/2021 - 02:59

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The use of Mobile phones is forbidden in our schools.

Hovever we're getting rid of that restriction because it helps us in online learning 

Submitted by Marata Fred on Sun, 12/19/2021 - 09:30

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Hi 

I am Fred Marata, a new student. I am happy to be part of this English learning students.

 

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