TeachingEnglish

Programme 9: Teacher reading

'Teaching reading' is a subject at the very heart of learning. What steps can we take to make students more confident readers? And how can we find a variety of materials - or 'texts' - for our students to read?

  

TeachingEnglish

Pink Bow Tie

A fourteen year old finds himself in trouble with the school Principal – again. This time, however, he has a genuine excuse, but is he likely to be believed?

TeachingEnglish

Dinosaur dig

dinosaur dig teaching kids lesson plan

In this lesson, students will be introduced to the popular story ‘Dinosaur dig’. They will watch the story, complete comprehension activities, look at some lexis for computer games and dinosaurs, and review the story. Finally students can do some extension work based on the story, finding out about dinosaurs, inventing their own, and presenting it to the class.

TeachingEnglish

Ali and the magic carpet

ali and the magic carpet teaching kids lesson plan

In this lesson, students will be introduced to the popular story ‘Ali and the magic carpet’. They will watch the story, complete comprehension activities, look at some lexis for weather and habitats, and review the story. Finally students can do some extension work based on the story, producing their own TV weather forecast and re-imagining the story.

TeachingEnglish

Socialising 1: Breaking the ice

For many people, the idea of walking into a room full of strangers and trying to socialise with them can be terrifying, especially if you have to use a foreign language. The barriers to ‘breaking the ice’ in a situation like this are just as much psychological as linguistic, which is why this lesson aims to get students thinking about the situation (through a quiz-based discussion and jigsaw reading) as much as speaking and practicing the skill of starting conversations with strangers.

TeachingEnglish

Negotiations 2: Positions and interests

The key to successful negotiation is preparation and research. This means finding out exactly what you want from the negotiation, and why you want it. This lesson includes a discussion, vocabulary input, a reading activity, useful language for negotiation, team problem solving and a role play in pairs.

TeachingEnglish

Meetings 4: Brainstorming and evaluating

Since its development in the 1950s, brainstorming has become one of the most common techniques used in meetings to generate ideas. However, despite its clear benefits, the technique has its faults and many improvements have been suggested and analysed. This lesson aims to provide practice of brainstorming at the same time as exploring possible improvements. The second half of the lesson focuses on the necessary follow-up to brainstorming: evaluating ideas. This means the lesson covers two of the key language functions of meetings: making suggestions and agreeing/disagreeing.

TeachingEnglish

Negotiations 3: Questioning and clarifying

In a negotiation, it’s very important to know when to speak, when to ask and when to shut up and listen. In this lesson students rank and discuss the stages of negotiation, do a reading activity and look at negotiations vocabulary, examine question types, then finish with a role play to practise clarifying, summarising and responding.

TeachingEnglish

Socialising 3: Social networking

Why is it that when you go to a conference or business gathering, everyone else seems to know each other already? At least part of the answer to the puzzle seems to be social networking: getting to know business contacts online first, so that by the time you meet face to face for the first time, you already have plenty to talk about. For many people, social networking is seen as something to do instead of work. This lesson emphasises that social networking is real work. The lesson introduces useful language and techniques, building up to a large social networking simulation at the end.

TeachingEnglish

Be Near Me

This extract from Andrew O’Hagan’s novel, Be Near Me, is centred around a boat trip that the narrator – a priest – is taking with two of his young parishioners. Mark, a 15-year-old boy, is recalling a football match that, temporarily, seemed to bring him a little closer to his father.

The boat trip itself seems to cast a magical spell on the trio. Will they be the same afterwards?

You can download the student worksheet and teacher’s notes below. You can also listen to the audio and read the transcript.

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