Day 3 of the intensive Business Cultural Trainers Certificate and we all agree that creating critical incident scenarios is an excellent way of increasing cultural awareness and because critical incidents are short and sweet they are often better than full scale case studies.

Day 3 of the intensive Business Cultural Trainers Certificate and we all agree that creating critical incident scenarios is an excellent way of increasing cultural awareness and because critical incidents are short and sweet they are often better than full scale case studies. But where to find them? Kashika Mueller is a British Asian, living in Germany and working with Russians. She suggests the following. Collect as many examples as you can of 'flashpoints', incidents of misunderstanding, and then turn them into 'What if...? scenarios. I.E. This problem occurred between X and Y. What would you do to resolve it? The question is, how do you build your library of critical incidents? Go back over your own international experience, talk to friends and colleagues, listen to the experiences of your students and read books. Robin Cunninghame Graham recommends MW Lustig and J Koester (2006) Intercultural Competence (Publisher: Pearson longman) as a good source.

Here's one for your library. Kashika knows that Russian friends can be very possessive. She remembers how at a dinner, sitting between two Russian women friends, they each literally held her chin and turned it to face them in order to talk to her exclusively? True or false? What would you do in that situation?

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