TeachingEnglish
Are you grammar allergic?

I've come across this comics: http://ow.ly/i/t8bb, and immediately thought: I am one of those grammar allergic guys. And something has to be done about it.When I listen to someone speaking English, I want to correct all the mistakes at once. When I check a written assignement, my hands are itchy to underline every error I see. I hardly surpress the desire to make everything right. Moreover, seeing all the work covered in red demotivates students. Is it a professional desease?One of the good techniques I learnt when preparing for my TKT was that you correct the mistakes connected only with the topic you and your students are having now. If it's articles, correct only articles. If it's prepositions, concentrate on prepositions.Though perfectionist inclinations sometimes take over. And you? Are you grammar allergic? 

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Anna_Leshchenko's picture
Anna_Leshchenko

Oh, I got rid of that allergy ))) But if we talk of private tutoring and getting ready for their final exam, you'll have to check and explain all the mistakes.I believe students should be aware that the teacher doesn't correct all the mistakes, because some of your students can have a private tutor who can find the rest of the mistakes...I have a pupil who always asks me to recheck her reports and compositions and explain each and every mistake. Ethically, I have no right to judge other teachers' work, so I comment to my students that there is such a technique (and I've also found it out from TKT preperation course) and her teacher might be using it... So it's like an excuse (unfortunately, I see her teacher actually doesn't see all the mistakes).So the question is if the students like the idea of checking only some of the mistakes...

OlgaTimofeeva's picture
OlgaTimofeeva

Hmmm..frankly speaking I have no words in reply. Working with kids under 12 no one teacher can practise language skills perfectly and more over having been working in international projects for nearly three years I understand thet even native speakers make grammar mistakes. Language is constantly changing and old grammar rules very often seem to be so unusual for using in everyday speaking. Believe me, I've got a native speaker in my class - Dominic, and he gave me lots of advice how to speak correctly)))

Anna_Leshchenko's picture
Anna_Leshchenko

I've got a native speaker in my class - Dominic, and he gave me lots of advice how to speak correctly)))Grammar allergic student?

OxanaKhrushcheva's picture
OxanaKhrushcheva

If it's a written assignment I tend to correct all mistakes and comment upon them afterwards.But in case with oral speech I follow the opposite tactics and correct only those mistakes that impede understanding.I suppose it makes my students write carefully and speak freely.