Using podcasts to develop listening skills

They are an excellent way to work on your, or your students’, listening skills, as you can listen to them as many times as you want to. If you’re feeling adventurous, you can also manipulate files so that they are faster or slower, or so that you are only listening to an excerpt of the whole programme.

Average: 5 (3 votes)

Blog topics for March/April 2016

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The blog topics for March/April are below:

Average: 5 (1 vote)

Chia Suan Chong - Reflecting on teaching

But deeper understanding can only occur with the ability to reflect: to review, to notice, and to think carefully about what had taken place.

This is true for our students and is certainly true for us teachers looking to improve our practice.

But how can we become more reflective teachers?

1. Formal Observations

Many schools have a Director of Studies observing a teacher when they are newly employed, and subsequently, once every 6 months or more. Such observations often have an evaluative function.


Average: 4 (4 votes)

Rachael Roberts - Motivation

I recently started to brush up my German. I last studied German many years ago at school and I can’t say that it was a great success. In fact, I failed the exam and had to retake it. Hardly surprising, as I seem to remember spending a good portion of the exam time writing out David Bowie lyrics!

Average: 3.3 (11 votes)

Blog topics for November 2015

Hi everyone

Apologies for the late posting of this month's blog topics! Here they are. 

Promoting 21st Century Skills is one of the professional practices in the British Council’s new Continuing Professional Development (CPD) framework. But what exactly are 21st Century skills and are they the same as digital literacies?

In two recent articles written by Gavin Dudeney, he explores the four key digital literacies: focus on connections, on language, on information and on (re)design. He also looks at the distinction between these and 21st century skills. 

Average: 4 (3 votes)

Blog topics for September and October 2016

Many thanks for all of your blog posts in July and August this year! For those of you going back to school this month, we wish a great new academic year! 

Our four new topics for September and October 2016 look at the theme of 'assessing learning' and ask you to think about some of the ways we can assess learners and the effects and implications of assessment. 

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Vicky Saumell: Using rubrics to assess projects

We have been using PBL for 6 years already and one of the most difficult aspects to work on has been assessment. After a few trial-and-error takes on project assessment, I decided to stick with rubrics.

A rubric is a document that clearly states the expectations for an assignment, task or project by listing the criteria and levels of achievement or performance.

No votes yet

David Petrie: Exam classes - keeping the balance

The answer to that question will obviously differ depending on the students, their previous learning experience, what they do in their free time and what their strengths and weaknesses are in English, but the one thing that none of them will need or benefit from is exam practice.
This might be a slightly controversial thing to claim as exam practice does form the mainstay of many exam preparation courses, teachers often see it as having value and students seem to want it.  A 2010 study (Perrone) found that exam practice in FCE classes rose from
No votes yet

Larry Ferlazzo: Strategies for self assessment

Carol Dweck, the psychologist well-known for her work on a growth mindset suggests that creating opportunities for students to clearly see for themselves the growth in their own knowledge can help give them a

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Vicky Saumell: The role of methodologies and approaches in organic lessons

Over the years, I have found that due to my own beliefs about the teaching and learning processes, I tend to favour certain strategies over others. However, I can say that my lessons usually include an eclectic mix. The question is “How does this mix come about?”

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