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Bressan, E. and V.M. Cribb. 2007. ‘Group project work in higher education: What it is and what it is not’ in From Applied Linguistics to Linguistics Applied. Birmingham: British Association of Applied Linguistics / Irish Association for Applied Linguistics, pp. 180-194.
Type of entry: Book chapter
Book editor(s): Conrick, M. and M. Howard.
ISBN: 0-7044-2627-7
Summary: Looks at how home and international students interact in group project work in higher education.
Descriptor(s): Assessment, Cultural issues, ESOL/EAL
Country of research: United Kingdom
Learners' background: various
Institutional level: tertiary
Entered by: Coventry University
Van Moere, A. 2007. Group Oral Tests: How Does Task Affect Candidate Performance and Test Scores?.
Type of entry: Doctoral thesis
Supervisor(s): Alderson, J.C.
Awarding institution: Lancaster University
Thesis type: PhD
Descriptor(s): Assessment, Speaking
Entered by: Lancaster University (Linguistics and English Language)
Preece, S. 2009. ‘A group of lads, innit?' Performances of laddish masculinity in British higher education’ in Gender and Spoken Interaction. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 115-138.
Type of entry: Book chapter
Book editor(s): Pichler, P. and E. Eppler.
ISBN: 978-0-230-57402-1
Summary: This chapter looks at how gender is performed in spoken interaction in the English language classroom.
Descriptor(s): Classroom interaction, Cultural issues, English language, ESOL/EAL
Country of research: United Kingdom
Learners' background: various
Institutional level: tertiary
Entered by: Institute of Education, London (Department of Learning, Curriculum and Communication)
Chang, Y.H. 2006. Group Influences on Individual Learners' Motivation: A Study of Group Dynamics in EFL Classrooms.
Type of entry: Doctoral thesis
Supervisor(s): Ushioda, E. and J. Kennedy
Awarding institution: University of Warwick
Summary: A study of group dynamics and its influences on individual learner motivation, using questionnaires and interviews
Thesis type: PhD
Descriptor(s): Learner autonomy/strategies, Learner cognition
Country of research: Taiwan
Learners' background: Taiwan
Institutional level: tertiary
Entered by: University of Warwick (Centre for Applied Linguistics)
Batziakas, B. 2010. ‘Greek-L1 learners of English’ in Teaching the Pronunciation of English as a Lingua Franca. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 110-114.
Type of entry: Book chapter
Book editor(s): Walker, R.
ISBN: 978-0194422000
Descriptor(s): Methodology, Pronunciation
Country of research: Greece
Learners' background: Greece
Entered by: King's College London (Department of Education and Professional Studies)
Kormos, J., K. Csizér, A. Menyhárt and D. Török. 2008. ‘"Great Expectations": The motivational profile of Hungarian English language students’. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 7: 65-82.
Type of entry: Journal article
Summary: In this article we investigate what characterizes the language learning motivation of Hungarian English language students. The interview data revealed that the respondents did not invest sufficient energy in maintaining and improving their language competence. This is explained with reference to a low level of learner autonomy primarily caused by teacher-centered instruction.
Descriptor(s): Learner autonomy/strategies
Country of research: Hungary
Learners' background: Hungary
Institutional level: tertiary
Entered by: Lancaster University (Linguistics and English Language)
Thompson, G. 2009. ‘Grammatical metaphor and success in academic writing’ in Introducing Applied Linguistics. London: Routledge, pp. 27-34.
Type of entry: Book chapter
Book editor(s): Hunston, S. and D. Oakey.
ISBN: 9780415447683
Descriptor(s): English language, ESOL/EAL, ESP, Writing
Country of research: United Kingdom
Learners' background: various
Institutional level: tertiary
Entered by: University of Liverpool (School of English)
Chuang, F.-Y. and H. Nesi. 2008. ‘GrammarTalk: International students' responses to an online grammar resource’ in Proceedings of the BAAL Annual Conference on Technology, Ideology and Practice in Applied Linguistics. London: Scitsiugnil Press.
Type of entry: Paper in conference proceedings
Editor(s): Edwardes, M.
Principal format: CD-ROM
Summary: This paper investigates international students' responses to GrammarTalk, a set of interactive grammar materials designed to help Chinese EAP students improve their formal accuracy.
Descriptor(s): Materials, Writing
Country of research: United Kingdom
Learners' background: various
Institutional level: tertiary
Entered by: University of Warwick (Centre for Applied Linguistics)
Chuang, F.-Y. and H. Nesi. 2007. ‘GrammarTalk: Developing computer-based materials for the Chinese EAP student’ in Proceedings of the Joint Conference of BALEAP (British Association of Lecturers in English for Academic Purposes) and SATEFL on New Approaches to Materials Development for Language Learning. Bern: Peter Lang, pp. 315-330.
Type of entry: Paper in conference proceedings
Editor(s): Alexander, O.
Principal format: Printed
Summary: This paper describes the process of developing GrammarTalk, a set of interactive grammar materials designed to help Chinese EAP students improve their formal accuracy.
Descriptor(s): ESOL/EAL, Learning technologies, Materials, Writing
Country of research: United Kingdom
Learners' background: China
Institutional level: tertiary
Entered by: University of Warwick (Centre for Applied Linguistics)
Orsini-Jones, M., D. Jones and C. Sinclair. 2007-2008. ‘Grammar, Researching Activities for Student Progress’.
Type of entry: Externally funded project
Funding body: Subject Centre for Languages, Linguistics and Area Studies (LLAS)
Summary: A team formed by language lecturers, instructional designers and a lecturer in linguistics aimed at identifying the grammar ‘stumbling blocks’ encountered by students when engaging with learning to learn languages and design a task that would help students with overcoming them. 3
URL: http://www.llas.ac.uk/resourcedownloads/2631/orsinijones.pdf
Descriptor(s): Assessment, Curriculum/syllabus, English language, Learner autonomy/strategies, Learning technologies
Country of research: United Kingdom
Learners' background: various
Institutional level: tertiary
Entered by: Coventry University
Lai Wan Chiu, H. 2010. Grammar Teaching Concepts and Practice in the Task-based Secondary English Curriculum in Hong Kong.
Type of entry: Doctoral thesis
Supervisor(s): Andrews, R.
Awarding institution: Institute of Education, University of London
Summary: This thesis aims to investigate how grammar teaching is perceived and practised within the task-based secondary curriculum of Hong Kong. The study covers three major areas of investigation: (a) language teaching policy and curriculum in Hong Kong; (b) language and grammar teaching materials; and (c) individual teachers’ grammar teaching concepts and practice.
Thesis type: PhD
Descriptor(s): Curriculum/syllabus, ESOL/EAL, Writing
Country of research: Hong Kong
Learners' background: Hong Kong
Institutional level: secondary
Entered by: Institute of Education, London (Department of Learning, Curriculum and Communication)
Chuang, F.-Y. and H. Nesi. 2007. ‘Grammar Talk: Developing computer-based materials for Chinese EAP students’ in New Approaches to Materials Development for Language Learning. Oxford: Peter Lang, pp. 315-330.
Type of entry: Book chapter
Book editor(s): Alexander, O.
ISBN: ISBN 978-3-03910-909-8
Summary: This paper describes the design of corpus-based online materials to address students’ most common grammatical mistakes, to improve proofreading skills, and to provide international EAP students with flexible and independent learning support. The materials were particularly targeted at Chinese and East Asian learners.
Descriptor(s): ESP, Learning technologies, Materials, Writing
Country of research: United Kingdom
Learners' background: China
Institutional level: tertiary
Entered by: Coventry University
Hunston, S. 2007. ‘Grammar patterns and literacy’ in Advances in Language and Education. London: Continuum, pp. 254-267.
Type of entry: Book chapter
Book editor(s): McCabe, A., M.B. O'Donnell and R. Whittaker.
ISBN: 9780826489609
Summary: The paper investigates the contribution of recurring patterns of lexis and grammar to redundancy. This is linked to the role of redundancy in reading practices.
Descriptor(s): English language, Reading
Entered by: University of Birmingham (Centre for English Language Studies and Department of English)
Reinders, H. and M. Lewis. 2010. Good Teacher, Better Teacher: Strategies for the Multicultural Classroom. Tokyo: Perceptia Press.
ISBN: 978-4-939130-77-9
Type of entry: Authored book
Descriptor(s): Classroom interaction, Cultural issues, Teacher education
Entered by: Middlesex University (Learner Development Unit)
Morris-Adams, M. 2008. ‘Going outside the classroom’ in Professional Encounters in TESOL. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 105-122.
Type of entry: Book chapter
Book editor(s): Garton, S. and K. Richards.
ISBN: 978-0-230-55351-4
Summary: The chapter looks at topic management strategies employed by learners during informal interactions with native English speaking peers.
Descriptor(s): Classroom interaction, English language, Learner autonomy/strategies, Speaking
Country of research: United Kingdom
Learners' background: various
Institutional level: tertiary
Entered by: Aston University (School of Languages and Social Sciences)
Block, D. 2010. ‘Globalisation and language teaching’ in Handbook of Language and Globalisation. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 287-304.
Type of entry: Book chapter
Book editor(s): Coupland, N.
ISBN: 978-1405175814
Summary: This paper examines the rise of Communicative Language Teaching, the ongoing struggle in English language teaching (ELT) to reconcile the global and the local, global textbooks as mediators of ELT and finally, how publishers position learners as cosmopolitan consumers and have set up branded identities for them to aspire to.
Descriptor(s): ESOL/EAL
Entered by: Institute of Education, London (Department of Learning, Curriculum and Communication)
Ferguson, G. 2007. ‘The global spread of English, scientific communication and ESP: Questions of equity, access and domain loss’. Ibérica 13/1: 7-38.
Type of entry: Journal article
Descriptor(s): English language, ESP
Entered by: University of Sheffield (School of English)
Enever, J. and J. Moon. 2010. ‘A global revolution? Teaching English at primary school’.
Type of entry: Unpublished
Summary: English is being taught at increasingly younger ages in an expanding number of countries. So today, teenagers are no longer young learners of English. The new YL is a first grader, a pre-schooler or even a foetus! The online paper and video link discusses this phenomenon from a global perspective.
URL: http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/seminars/a-global-revolution-teaching-english-primary-school
Descriptor(s): Cultural issues, Curriculum/syllabus, English language, Management/Innovation, Teacher education
Country of research: various
Institutional level: primary
Entered by: London Metropolitan University (Faculty of Humanities, Arts, Languages and Education)
Gilmore, A. 2008. Getting Real in the Language Classroom: Developing Japanese Students' Communicative Competence with Authentic Materials.
Type of entry: Doctoral thesis
Supervisor(s): Carter, R.A. and Z. Dörnyei
Awarding institution: University of Nottingham
Thesis type: PhD
Descriptor(s): Classroom interaction, Learner autonomy/strategies
Learners' background: Japan
Entered by: University of Nottingham (School of English Studies)
Schauer, G.A. 2008. ‘Getting better in getting what you want: Language learners' pragmatic development in requests during study abroad sojourns’ in Developing Contrastive Pragmatics: Interlanguage and Cross-cultural Perspectives. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, pp. 399-426.
Type of entry: Book chapter
Book editor(s): Puetz, M. and J. Neff-van Aertselaer.
ISBN: 978-3-11-019670-2
Summary: This chapter investigates the impact of the study abroad context on language learners’ pragmatic development by focusing on request strategies. Requests were selected as the focus of the investigation, since being able to appropriately ask for their interlocutor’s help or cooperation is an essential skill for language learners.
Descriptor(s): Cultural issues, English language, Speaking
Country of research: various
Learners' background: Germany
Institutional level: tertiary
Entered by: Lancaster University (Linguistics and English Language)
Lillis, T., D. Hewings, D. Vladimirou and M.J. Curry. 2010. ‘The geolinguistics of English as an academic Lingua Franca: citation practices across English medium national and English medium international journals’. International Journal of Applied Linguistics 20/1: 111-135.
Type of entry: Journal article
Summary: This article explores how the global status of English is influencing knowledge production and circulation, focusing on citations in English medium national and English medium international journal articles. Drawing on text, ethnographic and corpus data from a longitudinal study in four national contexts, we argue that citation practices vary significantly along geolinguistic lines which are highly consequential.
Descriptor(s): English language, ESOL/EAL, ESP, Methodology, Writing
Country of research: various
Learners' background: various
Entered by: The Open University (Faculty of Education and Languages)
Pramoolsook, I. 2008. Genre Transfer from Dissertations to Research Articles among Thai Scientists.
Type of entry: Doctoral thesis
Supervisor(s): Gardner, S.F.
Awarding institution: University of Warwick
Thesis type: PhD
Entered by: University of Birmingham (School of Education)
Hyland, K. 2007. ‘Genre pedagogy: Language, literacy and L2 writing instruction’. Journal of Second Language Writing 16/3: 148-164.
Type of entry: Journal article
Descriptor(s): ESP, Writing
Entered by: Institute of Education, London (Department of Learning, Curriculum and Communication)
Handford, M.J.A. 2007. The Genre of the Business Meeting: A Corpus-Based Study.
Type of entry: Doctoral thesis
Supervisor(s): Adolph, S. and M.J. McCarthy
Awarding institution: University of Nottingham
Thesis type: PhD
Descriptor(s): English language, ESP
Entered by: University of Warwick (Centre for Applied Linguistics)
Hyland, K. 2008. ‘Genre and academic writing in the disciplines’. Language Teaching 41/4: 543-562.
Type of entry: Journal article
Descriptor(s): ESP, Methodology, Writing
Entered by: Institute of Education, London (Department of Learning, Curriculum and Communication)