This lesson plan for teachers of teenagers and adults at Intermediate level and above explores the theme of the Black Country, a region in the UK. Students will develop their knowledge of a part of the UK, as well as practising their vocabulary and listening skills.

UK map

Introduction

This lesson is part of a series of plans based on interviews with people from around the UK. It explores a listening text about a part of the UK known as the ‘Black Country’. In the lesson, students have the chance to listen to someone from that area describing what they like about living there and a little about their life. Students also have the chance to reflect on their own part of the world and finally to do some intensive listening.

Other parts of the UK these lesson plans focus on include Scotland, the North East of England, and London.

Topic

Living in the Black Country

Level

Intermediate +

Time

60 minutes +

Aims:

  • To develop students’ ability to take information from quite a difficult listening text
  • To develop their deeper listening skills
  • To help students find out a little more about a part of the UK

Materials 

Lesson plan: guide for teacher on procedure.

Download lesson plan

Audio files:

Audio file - Interview

Intensive listening clips:


By Nik Peachey


Copyright - please read
All the materials on these pages are free for you to download and copy for educational use only. You may not redistribute, sell or place these materials on any other web site without written permission from the BBC and British Council. If you have any questions about the use of these materials please email us at: teachingenglish@britishcouncil.org
 

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Comments

a great conversation! my students enjoyed it! Thank you!!!

The resources are quite rich. I along with my friends were really benifited through the courses !!

Check the spelling of Bajit Sidhu: Well, it’s kind of weird, like if you go to West Brom; there’s a bit of a Black Country twat, which, to outsiders may not sound very different from people from Birmingham – they’re like ‘no, that’s a Black Country accent, that’s not a Brummie accent, we speak differently’. But I think if you go out to the towns, I think we’re still quite proud of the accent. I think she means to say    twang! 

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