Do you use songs in your lessons? How? Watch how Seema uses them and then share your ideas below!

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Really, songs can work effectively when we teach small children. it's like they remember different advertisements and their memory flashes in the moment they hear something familiar and then reflections follow one by one. It is also very nice when children were brought up in love to listening poems from early years. But further on it becomes more difficult to use this teaching device in the classroom, especially when working with students, for example. However, singing songs in English are rather attractive during extracurriculum activities.

I'm quite a new teacher but I've used one or two songs or chants with my adult group and my one to one adult learners. In my group o Ukrainian professionals, we were doing the theme of 'Fit and healthy' (Elementary level), as outside work, they all go to yoga, dance classes or to the gym. After labelling body parts and doing various activities, we did a chant with 'Heads, Shoulders, Knees and Toes' around the conference room table, which was great fun - my adult group loved it. Then we had a look at the Bruno Mar's song, 'Just the Way you Are' on YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjhCEhWiKXk). We watched the video first on mute and the adults had to guess what body part words he would use in the song, then on a worksheet I made a word gap exercise with words like face, lips, hair etc missing for the students to write in as they listened to the song. With the one-to-one students, we look at different songs, trying to link them in with the lesson theme, usually including some vocabulary we've learnt in a particular lesson. I use CDs or even old cassette tapes!. You can do word gaps or give the students a list of words with an extra word that's not in the song. The student ticks off the words as they appear in the song and is left with the extra word. Recently I did the song 'Where you Are' by Whitney Houston, as it was topical and one of my students particularly liked her songs. It has quite simple vocabulary. Hope this helps. Lucy (Cyprus)

I like the idea of singing for teenage or adult students. I have been thinking of using the technique form "The King's Speech", where I have the student listen to music on headphones, have them sing the song while I record their voice and then have them listen to it. I think it will probably crack most adults up at first, but then they can hear themselves and their pronunciation as compared to the artist's and mine. This might help them be more mindful of their own mistakes, which tend to be different for each student, and later it may be easier for them to correct themselves.What do you think?Catalina

I enjoyed watching the video about your classes, Seema. It's amazing how quickly young learners pick up the words and how much they enjoy all the actions. Thank-you.

Glad you enjoyed it! :)Young learners have so much enthusiasm and energy. Songs are just perfect for them! Especially to lighten the linguistic demands of tasks in foreign language lessons!

I have been using songs for a long time and I do think this method is very effective.Not only students get engaged but also learn a lot.Halina

please help me,The speed of my internet is not suitable to let me watch the videosplease put  texts which describe the videos

Hi everybody, who is using songs at lessons!!!  For my students, in our small town in Russia (Sharypovo, Krasnoyarsk krai), it's the one way to hear the native speakers. We hear and sing songs with pleasure, even I haven't an ear for music :-)))

Thanks a lot dear Rob for  excellent topic, I mean, using songs in the classroom is the main motivation for students, kids. I use them very often, and it works greatly! This is called effective teaching and learning. Kids like such kinds of activities, they start remembering things better, they learn everything with great pleasure, and are always interested in learning useful materials, which promote their way of thinking, enhance their scope of knowledge, enlarge the vocabulary, and just cause them to have fun!

Thanks for sharing this experience, it is very educational.I teach  adult students and sometimes I use songs to help them pronounce and understand the meaning of words.         I usually have the lyrics writen down and I ask them to read until they pronounce it well enough and understand the meaning as if it were a spoken piece of writing. Once they have mastered the pronunciation (without musical rhythim) then I play the song and ask the students to listen to it withouth reading the lyrics so they can learn from it while it is spoken. Finally they do an exercise in which they listen to the song and read the writing at the same time, in order  to reinforce their learning and the way it is correctly pronounced.This might not be the best method but it has worked for some of my students. I would like to have a link where I can find some "pedagogical" songs with their lyrics and also I would like to know if there is a better approach to this type of teaching.Thanks,Efrain

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