This lesson is for teenagers or young adults with a language level of A2-B2 and focuses on using prepositions of place to describe and draw a picture.

Author: 
Katherine Bilsborough

Introduction

In this lesson students will learn how to use prepositions of place correctly when they are describing a picture. Firstly, the students give the teacher a drawing dictation as a whole class. Then they work in small groups to give drawing dictations to each other. Teachers can adapt the level of this activity by making the language more or less complex. The core language from this lesson will be useful for oral exams in which students have to describe or compare pictures.

Topic

Drawing dictations

Level

A2-B2

Time

50-60 minutes

Aims

  1. To learn how to use prepositions of place correctly when describing a picture.
  2. To practise giving instructions.
  3. To work in a group, sharing information to complete a drawing task.

Materials:

All the materials are available to download below. Your students will also need a pencil and paper.

Downloads
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Comments

The link has been fixed now, so you should be able to open it without problems. Please let us know if you still can't open it.

Thanks,
Cath

Hi Amna

I've just opened it fine. Could you try another browser and see if that helps.

Best wishes

Del

In the Procedure part, where the rule for using a preposition with two places is given, it says the answer is: "At the bottom right."

But the rule is when using a preposition with two places is that the proposition agrees with the last place. So shouldn't the answer be "on the bottom right" as "right" is the second or last placed preposition and we say "on" for right and left?

Or am I missing something...?

Hello Thaidiamond,
Thanks for your comment - you are right that, according to the rule, we should say 'On the bottom right'. It can depend on the context though - for example, if we qualify that phrase with, for example, 'At the bottom right of the picture, we can see...' then 'at' works here. Prepositions are confusing for students (because they are generally confusing as they can often depend on context!). I think it would be a good idea to highlight this to students.
Thanks for pointing this out!
Best wishes,

Cath
TE Team

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