A blog, or weblog, is a website which functions as a diary or personal journal. The writer makes regular additions to the site in text, file and image form, and others add comments. The latest entry appears first, and other people can leave comments on what is written, encouraging a dialogue to develop between the writer and the readers.

Example
The Guardian newspaper and the BBC now have blogs on their online sites.

In the classroom
Class blogs are an excellent way to motivate learners to produce English, and the applications such as ‘Blogger' make them extremely easy to start. Students can be encouraged to communicate with each other outside class through a blog. To monitor them, many teachers use a central ‘hub' blog of their own, with links to learner blogs through this.

Further links:

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/using-web-resources-create-tasks-real-outcomes

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/using-social-media-classroom

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/sandy-millin-professional-development-through-blogs-blogging

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/become-a-teachingenglish-blogger

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Comments

Hi everyone,
I am writing a PhD thesis about blend formation in English. It focuses on the possibility of applying the English blend formation patterns on blending in French and Arabic. I would highly appreciate it if anyone shares any new blend they encounter whether in spoken or written contexts.
Best

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